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Air Pollution in China – A Photojournalist in Beijing

epa’s Regional Chief Photographer, Adrian Bradshaw, on air pollution in China

2003 we had the SARS outbreak and had to get to work wearing facemasks to avoid catching the deadly respiratory illness.

Heavy midmorning traffic amidst air pollution in Beijing, China, 25 November 2011. epa / Adrian Bradshaw

Heavy midmorning traffic amidst air pollution in Beijing, China, 25 November 2011. epa / Adrian Bradshaw — find out more

2014 and air pollution has made the old paper medical masks redundant: now we need industrial strength filters in our face masks. Even my ten year old daughter is an expert on the air quality index and PM2.5, the particulate measure that indicates whether the air is the usual ‘very unhealthy’ or the more alarming, maximum ‘hazardous’ level of 300.

A smartphone app shows hazardous levels of air pollution in Beijing, China, 26 March 2014. epa / Adrian Brashaw

A smartphone app shows hazardous levels of air pollution in Beijing, China, 26 March 2014. epa / Adrian Bradshaw

When the level reaches 150 or at some schools 200, all outdoor activities are halted. The index was only made to go up to 500, well above anything measured in the US where it originated, but it is now quite frequently off the charts in Beijing. As I write it is 427.

A policeman directs traffic in the heavy fog and smog in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 21 October 2013. Heavy fog shrouded northeastern China, disrupting traffic while pushing up air pollution in the cities. epa / Hao Bin

Heavy smog disrupts traffic in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 21 October 2013. epa / Hao Bin — find out more

The World Health Organisation has just released a report that as of 2012, the latest year with comprehensive figures, air pollution is the leading leading cause of premature death, accounting for more than 7 million deaths annually around the world. The problem is global but the epicentre is northeast Asia. The Chinese government is now openly tackling the problem of air pollution, at least rhetorically, after years of denial. Premier Li Keqiang declared ‘War on Pollution’ at his recent annual press conference as a national priority. An official survey made the observation that only three of China’s major cities meet national air quality standards. Thousands don’t.

Chinese citizens wear masks on a hazy day in Beijing, China, 16 January 2014. Reports stated that local governments in China may soon face stiffer fines and administrative punishment if found guilty of failing to implement air pollution prevention measures. epa / Rolex dela Pena

Chinese citizens wear masks on a hazy day in Beijing, China, 16 January 2014. Reports stated that local governments in China may soon face stiffer fines and administrative punishment if found guilty of failing to implement air pollution prevention measures. epa / Rolex dela Pena. — find out more

Survival takes precedence over getting pictures in those conditions and most people simply follow government orders and stay at home. When we do venture out it is with the best protection possible, either the maximum filtration of the 3M N99 disposable mask or the horror movie type Respro masks which bring back the look Hannibal Lector made so unfashionable in ‘Silence of the Lambs’. Even with these devices a constant hacking cough and stinging eyes has been the norm living in Beijing. A long term study just published by the British Medical Journal and Beijing University indicates that children born in Beijing now will lose 15 to 16 years of life expectancy due to toxins in the air.

Residents of Beijing try to cope with air pollution which exceeds the level of 400 on the air quality index, rating a hazardous warning, in Beijing, China, 26 March 2014. epa / Adrian Bradshaw

Residents of Beijing try to cope with air pollution which exceeds the level of 400 on the air quality index, rating a hazardous warning, in Beijing, China, 26 March 2014. epa / Adrian Bradshaw — find out more

Besides the personal concerns this story is one of global importance: it has been reported that the number one source of air pollution on the west coast of the US is China. Most of the toxins come from coal, much of which is imported from countries that insist on cutting out coal burning in their own territory but don’t seem to have a problem selling to China. This may change. In the meantime it feels like photographers are going to have to get used to a more monochrome look hereabouts.

Adrian Bradshaw Facing Air Pollution

Photographer Adrian Bradshaw ventures out with his respro N99 face mask to protect against hazardous levels of air pollution in Beijing, China, 23 March 2014. epa / Adrian Bradshaw

Photographer Adrian Bradshaw ventures out with his respro N99 face mask to protect against hazardous levels of air pollution in Beijing, China, 23 March 2014. epa / Adrian Bradshaw — find out more

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31. March 2014 by oliver
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Multiple Exposures – Experiences of a Photographer in Sochi

by How Hwee Young

Covering the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, is one of the best assignments I have received so far, but it was not without its usual or unusual hiccups as with any major coverage. It started on the third day of the Chinese Lunar New Year of the Horse with a 12-hour-flight from Singapore to Frankfurt for transit before landing in Sochi after another four hours in the air. Having just been relocated back from China to balmy Singapore, I was rather dreading the drastic difference in temperatures. Ditching the traditional light dresses of Chinese New Year visitations, I donned my heavy Beijing winter clothes again, which I had been hoping to lock away forever, to arrive in a temporary airport terminal on a wintry night with our Southeast Asia Chief Barbara Walton.

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

The main Sochi airport was not built to handle the hordes of journalists, photographers, athletes and visitors descending on the city. We watched with trepidation as our bags and equipment rolled in slowly on a single conveyor belt surrounded by a huge crowd of cold and tired passengers, all vying for the same limited number of trolleys. Getting our bags was only the first hurdle, we then have to queue with our heavy luggages to get our accreditation passes. The Russian volunteers in their colourful Sochi Olympic-themed jackets and caps directed us with smiles of cheerful exuberance to a table where they handed us our slick press passes fresh through lamination machines. It was however hard for the exhausted and grouchy photographer to return the smiles with the same joviality.

And of course the bus going to our hotel was full and there would not be another one stopping at our terminal. Unfazed, the cheery volunteers led us on foot with the same good spirits to the main terminal about 500 meters away, helping us push and pull our luggage and equipment along the way. They promised that would be a bus there that would take us to our hotel and only a five minute wait for the half hour journey.

Two hours later, we finally arrived at our accommodations. One would assume we could kick back and relax at last with a hot shower. But as usual, that was not to be. Hot water would not come on for us till two days later. By then, pretty much nothing could make our stay any worse or daunt our ‘toughened Olympic’ spirit…though I have heard that another journalist had his hotel room ceiling collapsed on him, but that’s another story.

Dancers perform among large helium inflatables creating the elements of St. Basil's cathedral during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

Dancers perform among large helium inflatables creating the elements of St. Basil’s cathedral during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

And so it is that we plunged into the Winter Olympics coverage. The opening ceremony was a wonderful spectacle of Russian largesse featuring key moments of the country’s history and arts. I had the floor position and was rather delighted to find at least three sites fixed with our epa cables during the rehearsal, making it easy for me to send my pictures direct from the camera wherever I was shooting on the floor. Or so I thought.

Olympic rings open up with one ring malfunctioning during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

Olympic rings open up with one ring malfunctioning during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

The last Olympic ring failing to open was not the only glitch in the opening ceremony. None of the cables worked for the first half of the actual show, through no fault of our dedicated epa IT technicians, though. It was a malfunction that affected everyone including all the other agencies. They however had at least two photographers each on the floor and had runners delivering their cards while I was the only one running like a headless chicken from one cable site to the next. I think there was a collective sigh of relief when the cables started working again, but none louder than mine!

Paige Lawrence and Rudi Swiegers of Canada react after the Pairs Short Program of the Figure Skating event at Iceberg Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 11 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

Paige Lawrence and Rudi Swiegers of Canada react after the Pairs Short Program of the Figure Skating event at Iceberg Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 11 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

The rest of the games was focused on figure skating and short track speed skating which I had been assigned to shoot. Photographing figure skating was a dream come true especially teamed with the tenacious Barbara and talented Tatyana Zenkovich of Belarus. I love the sport, the music and the beauty of skaters’ movements. The Canon 1D X paired with the 200-400mm lens was a perfect combination and I experimented heavily with multiple exposures and slow shutter speeds, often much to the chagrin of our brilliant sports editors led by the magnificent Gernot Hensel. It was however a liberation of creativity – to challenge what had been and what could be and I loved it!

Multiple Exposures: Gracie Gold of the USA

A multiple exposures picture of Gracie Gold of the USA performing in the women's Free Skating of the Figure Skating team event at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 09 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

A multiple exposure picture of Gracie Gold of the USA performing in the women’s Free Skating of the Figure Skating team event at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 09 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

Since I returned to Singapore, I have had many questions from people as to how the multiple exposures were done, some even asking how much time I spent on ‘comping’ the pictures together in post-production. I had to laugh because the time between when the pictures were taken on the camera and sent out on the wire was a matter of seconds! There was no time for any post production. Our editors would go mad if they have to do any of that nonsense!

Here’s how it’s done. The Canon 1D X has an in-camera multiple exposure function that would allow multiple exposures of up to 9 bursts to be exposed on a single frame. Composition, framing, shutter speeds, rhythm of the skaters in frame have to be decided in between 1/1600th to 1/8th of seconds. Cables connected directly to our cameras ensure that the pictures in their raw form are sent at 100 Mbit/s directly to editors hard at work in the main press centre. They make the selection, crop, levels, caption and the pictures are sent out on the wires within seconds. It was a speed game, and getting the best pictures out there in the shortest amount of time possible is paramount in the highly competitive arena of Olympic sports shooting for wire agencies.

Multiple Exposures: Yulia Lipnitskaya of Russia

A multiple exposures picture of Yulia Lipnitskaya of Russia performing during the women's Free Skating of the Figure Skating team event at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 09 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young

A multiple exposure picture of Yulia Lipnitskaya of Russia performing during the women’s Free Skating of the Figure Skating team event at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 09 February 2014. epa / How Hwee Young — find out more

Due to our grueling schedule, I only had time to visit the venues in the mountains on the second last day of the games and it was beautiful. I learnt how difficult and physically demanding it was for our colleagues up in the mountains to work in the snow ladened with heavy equipment yet manage to produce stunning images every day that wins the play for us. I was at once humbled and immensely proud to work alongside such esteemed colleagues.

Overall it was a great experience, one that surpassed my last Olympic coverage in Beijing and I am very glad to be able to meet so many talented and accomplished colleagues to learn from and be inspired by. I will miss all of you. Till next time!

epa photographer How Hwee Young at the Winter Olympics in Sochi. epa / Tanya Zenkovich

epa photographer How Hwee Young at the Winter Olympics in Sochi. epa / Tanya Zenkovich — find out more

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14. March 2014 by roberto
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Curling Pictures – Covering a Visually Underestimated Sport

by Tanya Zenkovich
It started in July 2013 when I got to know that I’ll be a part of the epa team for the Sochi Olympic Winter Games 2014. It was to be my most serious assignment ever.

A man stands near the Olympic cauldron in the Olympic Park in Sochi, Russia, 01 February 2014. The Sochi 2014 Olympic Games run from 07 to 23 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich

A man stands near the Olympic cauldron in the Olympic Park in Sochi, Russia, 01 February 2014. The Sochi 2014 Olympic Games run from 07 to 23 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich —- find out more

Sochi met me with palms and a very pleasant weather contrast: while in Minsk it was –18 Celsius, in Sochi it also felt like being 18 degrees, but now above zero. At the very beginning I couldn’t escape troubles though. A wrong accreditation pass was given to me at the airport. Anyway, I thought that standing in a line at the accreditation center to get a correct card, wasn’t the worst thing to happen.

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/Tatyana Zenkovich

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/Tatyana Zenkovich—- find out more

The first challenging task for me was to cover the opening ceremony of the Games. I got a really awesome position at the stadium: it was very central and high to make good panoramic shots. After the necessary preparations (briefing, plugging a cable into the camera, sending test pictures, defining settings in the camera set, and, of course, learning the ceremony schedule by heart), I couldn’t wait for the ceremony to commence. There’s one peculiar thing about events in Sochi: when they start there’s no stopping. Therefore, to get a nice shot one has to stay focused, be creative, be prepared, do everything fast and predict what’s going to happen the next moment. Time is so fast here! So it’s very important also to have some snacks with you at your working place so as not to be out of energy, when the crucial moments come. :)

Curling Pictures and Pajamas

Most of the time I spent taking curling pictures. At first I hardly knew what it was about. Some colleagues told me this sport is boring and that it’s hard to come up with interesting angles for curling pictures; still others assured me that it’s really nuts, great and an expressive competition to cover (and some of these “optimists” even sent me Youtube lessons how to play curling). Besides, I always asked my new acquaintances among the photographers who worked in Sochi whether they had had a chance to shoot curling pictures before and (if yes) what their experience had been.

Christoffer Svae of Norway delivers a stone during the tie-breaker match between Norway and Great Britain in the Curling competition in the Ice Cube Curling Center at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 18 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich

Christoffer Svae of Norway delivers a stone during the tie-breaker match between Norway and Great Britain in the Curling competition in the Ice Cube Curling Center at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 18 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich —- find out more

Indeed, curling turned out to be an exciting “playground” for experimenting! Multiple exposures, panning, slow shutter speed, zooming and twisting, game of shadows, different angles and an opportunity to move from one position to another during matches. My favorite team was from Norway. Because of the Norwegian team’s everyday-new funny uniform and curling slippers it seemed sometimes that the players wore trendy pajamas – a real stroke of luck for a photographer!

Jennifer Jones of Canada in action during the Women's Gold medal match between Sweden and Canada in the Curling competition in the Ice Cube Curling Center at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 20 February 2014. epa/Tanya Zenkovich

Jennifer Jones of Canada in action during the Women’s Gold medal match between Sweden and Canada in the Curling competition in the Ice Cube Curling Center at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, Sochi, Russia, 20 February 2014. epa/Tanya Zenkovich —- find out more

When I understood how a typical match develops and also found an effective algorithm of my actions for a match, life at the venue became much easier for me.

When the Games started I saw how many preparations the epa team had done in advance and how many people were involved in the process so that everything was running smoothly. I also realized that my work was only a small contribution to the huge working mechanism. And I’m pretty sure that what I could see is only the tip of the iceberg. So my task as a photographer was quite easy – just wait for a good moment and press the button.

It was a great experience for me to work with such a professional and cool team, to learn from them, and I’m very grateful to my colleagues whom I got to know there!

Tanya Zenkovich from Belarus, our photographer for curling pictures, jubilates under the olympic rings in front of the Olympic stadium in Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich

Tanya Zenkovich from Belarus, our photographer for curling pictures, jubilates under the olympic rings in front of the Olympic stadium in Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/ Tanya Zenkovich – —- see her portfolio

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07. March 2014 by oliver
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Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games – Challenges of a Picture Editor

By Karl Sexton
Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Russia – my first ‘big’ assignment as an editor with epa. I had had some prior experience in editing in the field, having worked at a European Council Summit in Brussels in 2013. Whilst that experience gave me an insight into what was expected of me in Sochi, the weeks I spent in Russia have taught me so much more about the job we do at epa.

At the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, coming to work at the Main Media Centre in the mornings is always a pleasure. epa/Nic Bothma

At the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, coming to work at the Main Media Centre in the mornings is always a pleasure.
epa/Nic Bothma

After nearly four years at the desk in Frankfurt, I am familiar with handling a large volume and variety of images from all parts of the world, having to stay on top of the news, and responding to clients or member agency requests, as well as to breaking news stories. However, our shooters usually submit photographs that are pre-edited. Most of the time, the photos are technically ready to be transmitted to the wire, leaving the editor to focus on caption quality, picture selection, and making sure all the angles of a particular story are covered.

The role of an editor at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic games or other such events is very different. Here, photographers send their images often straight from the camera, only a matter of seconds after the event or incident they are covering has occurred.

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/Tatyana Zenkovich

Dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games at the Fisht Olympic Stadium, Sochi, Russia, 07 February 2014. epa/Tatyana Zenkovich

The shooters can transmit hundreds of raw, unedited images in only a few short minutes, and it is up to the editors in the media centre to sort through the myriad of different angles from various photographers, choose the best pictures and begin the post-production work, such as balancing colour levels and cropping, as well as captioning the photos. All of this has to be done at speed, in order to deliver a high-quality product to our clients in the timeliest fashion possible. We watch television monitors with live feeds of the events we are covering to stay on top of the action, and we use online information services to keep track of details such as results, scores, and spellings of athletes names, to name but a few.

epa editors at work during the during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. Picture on the right: Gernot Hensel keeping a steady hand on the helm of the ship / On the left Stephan Mueller and Karl Sexton loving their Figure Skating editing. epa/Nic Bothma

epa editors at work during the during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. Picture on the right: Gernot Hensel keeping a steady hand on the helm of the ship / On the left Stephan Mueller and Karl Sexton loving their Figure Skating editing. epa/Nic Bothma

These aspects of truly participating in the production of the image and feeling real proximity to the action are some which I have found hugely interesting, not to mention satisfying. Seeing an image in play that you have edited from a raw file to a finished product is a real source of professional pride, even if it is the photographer who (deservedly!) takes most of the glory.

Endo Sho of Japan in action during the Qualification 1 of the Freestyle Skiing Men's Moguls competition at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, 10 February 2014. epa/Sergey ilnitsky

Endo Sho of Japan in action during the Qualification 1 of the Freestyle Skiing Men’s Moguls competition at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, 10 February 2014. epa/Sergey ilnitsky

Having spent the best part of a month at these Games, I have also had the immense pleasure of meeting and getting to know the people whose work I have the privilege of editing back at the desk in Frankfurt. It has been a massive learning experience and fantastic opportunity to exchange views and ideas on the job or on life, and to hear stories from colleagues and friends from every corner of the globe.

A multiple exposure image of South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, the reigning Olympic champion in the women's single event, during an open practice session at the Iceberg Palace during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. epa/Barbara Walton

A multiple exposure image of South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, the reigning Olympic champion in the women’s single event, during an open practice session at the Iceberg Palace during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. epa/Barbara Walton

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20. February 2014 by elio
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The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Russia – The IT Perspective

Ole Bratz, Head of IT at epa, takes us with him on a trip to Sochi. After you’ve seen the Olympics from all kinds of angles, this is a unique experience, you probably haven’t heard of yet.

The coverage of Olympic Games is challenging. The planning and preparations for the photo coverage of this major sports event started already 28 months ago, and included several visits to Sochi.
In addition to a dedicated team of professional photographers and editors, huge efforts have been made by administrative and IT teams for organizing transportation, accommodation and last but not least the technical set up. The real operation started when the freight consisting of several flight cases had been picked up in the first week of January to make its way to Sochi. That date marked the point of no return. Anything that’s missing, configured wrongly or not properly tested – too late. Luckily, the transport by truck from Frankfurt through several countries, borders and customs went well, and when epa’s IT colleagues Joerg Reuter and Helmut Emelius arrived in Sochi on January 17, all servers, computers, network equipment and several kilometers of network cable arrived in good shape and were taken into epa’s private office space in the Main Press Center. Now the advance party started organizing accommodation for the team, in this case it meant visiting construction sites, at least in the mountain area in Krasnaya Polyna, but conditions were not much better in the media accommodation at the coastal cluster in Sochi Adler. Quite on the contrary, they were terrible and only got better a few days before the opening of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. Joerg Reuter, who is heading epa’s IT operations at all major sports events, successfully met all major challenges for the benefit of the entire epa team.

One important lesson taught by the Russians: Everything is ready, no problem! (Regardless the facts)

In the week before Carsten Riedel and I arrived in Sochi, Joerg and Helmut had already set up the whole temporary editorial office with workstations, servers and network. And they cabled many photo positions in the Sochi Olympic Park such as the Iceberg Skating Place, the Adler Arena, the Bolshoy Ice Dome, the Shayba Arena, the Ice Cube Curling Center and the Medals Plaza.

Helmut on the catwalk in the Bolshoy arena at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Helmut fixing network cables for remote cameras on the catwalk in the Bolshoy arena. epa / Joerg Reuter

6000 meters of yellow CAT5 cable

The task was to connect every single of the 150 photo positions to the VLAN network which takes the photographers’ images with 100 Mbit/s speed from his or her camera to the editorial desk in the main Press Center. During the second week, after editors Gernot Hensel and Herbert Maier had also arrived, the mission headed towards accomplishment by pulling epa’s yellow network cables to all photo positions in the mountain cluster in the Laura Cross-Country Ski and the Biathlon Center, the Rosa Khutor Alpine Center, the Russki Gorki Jumping Center, the Sanki Sliding Center and the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. This became the real challenge: In addition to the actual cabling of approximately 6000 meters of yellow CAT5 cable, some in closed stadiums but mostly in the snow at downhill tracks, halfpipe, moguls, ski jump, biathlon and sliding, other obstacles like climbing or massive cable lengths of 100 meters came into play.

Joerg and Carsten pulling network cables at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Joerg and Carsten pulling network cables for direct image transmission from the photo cameras. epa / Matt Campbell

Carsten, Joerg, Gernot and Herbert at the  Laura Cross-Country, Ski and Biathlon center at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Carsten, Joerg, Gernot and Herbert at the Laura Cross-Country, Ski and Biathlon center at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. epa / Helmut Emelius

The Russian authorities prohibited all kind of encryption and VPN

Luckily, the timing and scheduling with photo and venue managers and our fellow agencies went rather smoothly due to the fact that we had already established a very friendly relationship with them. Security regulations were the main time consuming issue. By the way, so was our IT security. The Russian authorities prohibited all kind of encryption and VPN. Whenever we had to bring a vehicle with tools and technical equipment into an Olympic venue we were stopped at a vehicle checkpoint, although each technician had a special sticker showing a screwdriver on his accreditation pass, allowing him to carry tools, even knives. All passengers  had to step out and walk through a separate mag and bag check, the car and its contents were diligently searched by police or military personnel. The Russians – smart as they are – had them all dressed in friendly looking purple Sochi 2014 uniforms. Then back in the car, after all windows, doors and hoods had been sealed with stickers, off to the next checkpoint where all seals were checked to make sure we did not open a window or anything. Those procedures felt like they took forever. When we finally reached the venue the only problems to overcome were iced cable paths, frozen pipes, snowbound network cabinets and everything else related to IT hardware and people having to cope with the snow and the cold.

Snowbound cabinet at Extreme Park in Rosa Khutor at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Technicians wiring network cables to a snowbound network cabinet at Extreme Park in Rosa Khutor. epa/ Ole Bratz

The Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games kick off

6 days before the Opening Ceremony, the main photo and editorial team from all over the world arrived. Now everything became really busy because as a technician you are the single point of contact for everyone. But these few days of gathering with our friends and lovely colleagues before the real show started were the most enjoyable. They were the magic and epic moments that make the european pressphoto agency family very special.
Before the official start of the games, last modifications in the picture workflow were done, lines checked, configurations tested, remote support from the colleagues at home installed and connectivity fine-tuned. Now we were ready for the show to begin…
The master mind behind all epa sports coverage is Gernot Hensel, Deputy Editor-in-Chief and Head of the Sports Desk, editing wizard, all-round sports expert and well experienced leader of those operations. He is truly in his element when it’s show time and the going gets tough. The same can be said about all colleagues whether behind lenses or in front of computer screens, producing thousands of exciting images from the competitions, even special pictures by request for our partners and clients. Some colleagues standing in the cold next to an alpine track for a whole day and others rushing from one event to the next, from early to late, all without a break or a day off. The epa team is a real dream team, producing an excellent photo coverage for its customers all over the world.
What is left for the IT is the daily duty, some support, some fixing or replacement of a cut or frozen network cable. No more challenge until the show ends with the Closing Ceremony. Then everybody will be off back home, only the rear guard will roll back the operation and bring everything back home.
And an important Russian word: “Poyekhali”, as Yuri Gagarin said on his trip into the orbit. It is used when you raise the vodka glass as well.

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18. February 2014 by ole
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Nelson Mandela Funeral – Our Stories – by Kim Ludbrook

Kim Ludbrook, epa’s Regional Chief Photographer Africa, reflects his personal and professional experiences during the Nelson Mandela funeral

Planning for and covering the Nelson Mandela funeral was one of the most emotional, frustrating, tiring but memorable assignments I have ever been involved in.

As Regional Chief Photographer, my responsibility was to implement the Nelson Mandela funeral coverage, mostly following a basic plan that had been ready for almost ten years. Nelson Mandela passed away in the night of the 5th December 2013.

Nelson Mandela Funeral - Mourners sing songs outside the house of the late former South African president Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg, South Africa, early 06 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – Mourners sing songs outside the house of the late former South African president Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg, South Africa, early 06 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

What was very emotional for me and our team — West Africa Chief Nic Bothma, Kenya photographer Dai Kurokawa, and Bangkok editor Udo Weitz – was Mandela’s hospitalization.

The waiting became us and we became the waiting.

Often when my phone rang late at night for some other reason, I would think its the dreaded ‘Mandela call’.

“I realized it would be one of the defining assignments of my career, but as a South African I simply did not want him to die.”

Here, one didn’t speak of Mandela’s passing, it wasn’t done. It was perceived as incomprehensible by those outside the media industry to even be talking about it, let alone ‘planning’ to cover his funeral. We had to have a basic plan including staffing and technical details but knew along that we would only be given the final funeral plan days and even hours prior to the event’s happening.

I often worried about how I would personally cope with having to be in professional mode covering the event and then at the same time spending some personal time as a South African, relating to his death.

Nelson Mandela Funeral - Some of the hundreds of people paying their respects to Nelson Mandela dance and sing outside the house of the late South African president in Johannesburg, South Africa, 07 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – Some of the hundreds of people paying their respects to Nelson Mandela dance and sing outside the house of the late South African president in Johannesburg, South Africa, 07 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral - A mourner touches a photograph of late South African president Nelson Mandela placed outside Mandela's house in Johannesburg, South Africa, 06 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – A mourner touches a photograph of late South African president Nelson Mandela placed outside Mandela’s house in Johannesburg, South Africa, 06 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

This was answered on the first day of his lying in state at the Union Buildings in Pretoria. After having covered his coffin arriving at the buildings as a pool photographer, I asked officials if I could view his body along with the thousands of South Africans who where filing past his coffin.

Every person was searched for cameras and cell phones as the government and family, out of respect, did not want any images of Mandela in his open casket seen by the world. So I put my gear down and joined the line of people.

Nelson Mandela Funeral - The remains of the late Nelson Mandela arrive at the Union Buildings carried by military personal and followed by members of the Mandela family, Pretoria, South Africa, 11 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – The remains of the late Nelson Mandela arrive at the Union Buildings carried by military personal and followed by members of the Mandela family, Pretoria, South Africa, 11 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

What an amazing moment. It was a split second. We were not allowed to stop at his coffin but where made to keep walking past. So a mental snap shot it was. A one-second view of this icon lying in his coffin, so humble and peaceful. Wearing a trade mark Madiba shirt, he had a quiet smile and a sense of silence and happiness.

I cried. Not out of a sense of loss because I had seen the final moment of a soul that has forever changed humanity; I realized that after having photographed him for so many years that I would never see Mandela again. Ever.

After the Wednesday lying in state, our attentions turned to his final resting and burial in Qunu, the tiny rural village where he was to find his final resting place. Qunu would prove to be very difficult logistically. One thing was sure though; there was to be a total lock-down of his grave site and his family house by security, so news agencies arranged a pool system during the entire funeral and official events.

Only one wire photographer, one local newspaper photographer, one government photographer and one shooting for the family were allowed to cover what was the biggest funeral in living memory. The rest of the media corps had no option but to cover features of local villages watching the funeral from hills in the area and on huge TV screens set up by the government. This on its own did not provide as strong an image as we had predicted.

What was most memorable about the Qunu leg of the journey was that Nic Bothma, who had driven from Cape Town to Qunu the day Mandela died, had arranged in advance a stunning mud hut to base our crew for the final two days of the funeral.

Nelson Mandela Funeral - A woman prepares to watch the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela nearby at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – A woman prepares to watch the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela nearby at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Often as journalists we have memories of amazing experiences while covering stories, and this was one of them.
All six epa staffers where sleeping on the dung floor of the hut on mattresses, cooking our own food, running all power off car charges and loving it!

Nelson Mandela Funeral - Women prepare to watch the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela nearby at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – Women prepare to watch the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela nearby at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

The family who owned the hut had moved all their belongings to one hut next door and had made us feel so welcome and at home. On the Saturday night prior to the Sunday funeral, Dai Kurokawa and Paris photographer Ian Langsdon had even taken an outside shower under a huge rain storm with water pouring off the roof.

And so as fast as the story began at 11 p.m. on 05th December 2013 until late afternoon on 15th December, it ended.

Nelson Mandela Funeral - A young boy and some of the hundreds of others watch the last moments of the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

Nelson Mandela Funeral – A young boy and some of the hundreds of others watch the last moments of the funeral of the late Nelson Mandela at a public viewing point in her home village of Qunu, South Africa, 15 December 2013. epa / Kim Ludbrook

After we had transmitted our last images to our Frankfurt headquarters we ended up all sitting in the hut in rural Africa sharing stories and memories; South Africans, one Japanese based in Kenya, one American based in Israel, one British-American living in Paris and one German based in Bangkok.

The world of epa had come to say a final goodbye to a man we will never see the likes of again in our lifetimes.

RIP Nelson Mandela.

Thanks to epa’s amazing staff, editor Udo Weitz, photographers Ian Langsdon, Dai Kurokawa, Jim Hollander and Nic Bothma, and our stringers and desk editors for being part of this event.

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17. January 2014 by oliver
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Dennis M. Sabangan – Our Stories: Super Typhoon Haiyan

In a personal account, Dennis M. Sabangan, epa’s long-time Chief Photographer on the Philippines, reflects upon covering super typhoon Haiyan which has hit his country so brutally.

It was the day after the Super Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the country when I trooped to the Villamor airbase to catch a C130 flight to Tacloban. Typical of journalists, it is when everyone rushes away from a disaster, that we scramble to get close. It was such that when I arrived at VIllamor, there already was a long queue of journalists waiting for a flight to ground zero of the disaster area.

Only 15 passengers were allowed in on a first come first served basis and I was at the bottom of the list. It was only after endless negotiations with authorities that I was finally included in the manifesto of passengers.

Onboard a Philippine Air force helicopter showing A 'Help Us' sign is painted on the street is seen from Philippine Air force helicopter in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated Leyte province, Philippines 15 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

Onboard a Philippine Air force helicopter showing A ‘Help Us’ sign is painted on the street is seen from Philippine Air force helicopter in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated Leyte province, Philippines 15 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

Yet if physically getting to Tacloban was difficult already, just imagine the situation we had to contend with when we got there. From the airport, we had to walk four hours to reach the city, which didn’t look like a city anymore. Quite frankly, it looked as if a bomb had dropped. Nothing was spared. It was at that area that we shot some of the most heart breaking pictures.

A Night Under The Impression Of The Super Typhoon Haiyan

When night came, we all had to walk back to the airport. We slept inside the dilapidated office building of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAAP). It has four rooms and there, packed like sardines on the muddy floor, we tried to sleep.

epa photographer Dennis M. Sabangan (picture by Romy Portugal)

epa photographer Dennis M. Sabangan (picture by Romy Portugal)

Air traffic officer slept beside army men who slept beside us journalists–all of us enduring the cramped space, the humidity and the constant fear that the damaged ceiling might soon collapse. Fearing pneumonia, I slept instead on top of a 2ft by 3 ft table.

But it wasn’t just the fear of collapsing roofs and boding illnesses that plagued us. There was something more basic we had to fight with in Tacloban: our hunger. The food supplies we brought from Manila lasted all of two days. Once at the Tacloban airport, we befriended Air Force Lt. General Roy Deveraturda, former chief of the Central Command based at Mactan airbase. He gave his lunch to us to share with three other media colleagues.

Seven months pregnant Sally Reyes, 29, cries for mercy to board a military C-130 plane at the airport in in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines 12 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

Seven months pregnant Sally Reyes, 29, cries for mercy to board a military C-130 plane at the airport in in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines 12 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

As food and water were scarce, it took the cunningness of a street urchin to survive. To find food to feed the epa crew, we would get rice from one Air Force unit, and then go to another Army unit to get some more viands.

Francis* and I came in first along with other journalist friends, but our group soon grew.

Eventually, the epa crew grew to comprise of Mast Irham (Indonesia) Nic Bothma (South Africa) Bagus Indahono (Indonesia) Ritchie B. Tongo (Filipino) Rolex dela Pena (Filipino based in Beijing) and two more photographers, Joseph and Romy. Just imagine eight hungry men sharing four cups of rice placed on a banana leaf.

And then there was the time when we chanced upon an abandoned barangay** hall (office of the village chief) where three families took shelter after the storm. They shared their food with us which they said they found in a store. For a moment, I debated with myself, wondering if I should accept the food they offered knowing most likely that it was not paid for. But what the heck, I was hungry. I took the food only to realize grimly that the dead bodies we passed to enter the barangay hall were intentionally placed there by its occupants, “to ward off looters”, they said.

A Filipino air force officer prevents super typhoon Haiyan victims from crossing the tail motor during a food relief operation by the Philippine Air Force Sokol 550th Search and Rescue Group in the super typhoon devastated remote village of Bilokhayan in eastern Samar province, Philippines 17 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

A Filipino air force officer prevents typhoon victims from crossing the tail motor during a food relief operation by the Philippine Air Force Sokol 550th Search and Rescue Group in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated remote village of Bilokhayan in eastern Samar province, Philippines 17 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

A few days after we arrived in Tacloban, I had the chance to go with a SOKOL chopper to take aerial shots of Samar. The SOKOL helicopter airlifted sacks of rice, to give relief to the survivors. While on the plane, I observed how hardened pilots had to hold back their tears as they avoided the survivors rushing towards the chopper. They knew as well as I did that heads will be chopped off by the tail motor if they did not. But I saw how much they wanted to help. The moment we landed, survivors scrambled to get inside, to have a share of the sacks of rice. In their eyes I saw hunger and pain.

Yet, somehow we can still manage to tell jokes and laugh – a Filipino trait perhaps or a way to cope with the crises we face. Like when a survivor asked me if I had any medicine with me for his pus-filled wounds. “As much as I would like to help but the only medicine I have with me is for heart ailments. You might die of heart failure instead of your wounds”, I told him. He laughed.

I came to Tacloban as a photographer. But this experience has taught me important life lessons and skills for survival such as resourcefulness, building friendships and the true meaning of camaraderie. Yolanda (Haiyan) has given me the most humbling of experiences as I learned to swallow my pride to ensure the welfare of the epa team; that we would all survive the day and not sleep hungry so as to have the strength to start the next day and do it all again.

Filipino residents fix their makeshift house in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines, 24 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

Filipino residents fix their makeshift house in the super typhoon Haiyan devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines, 24 November 2013. epa / Dennis M. Sabangan

Just as I knew the mission of the soldiers and pilots we slept and ate with, I knew ours: to bring the images, and the stories behind those images to the world, and to show the realities of what this disaster has caused my country. Only then can the true magnitude of the displacement and suffering it has caused be seen, so we can help the victims regain their dignity and rebuild their lives.

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*Francis R. Malasig, epa staff photographer on the Philippines

**A barangay formerly called barrio, is the smallest administrative division in the Philippines and is the native Filipino term for a village, district or ward.

epa photographer Dennis M. Sabangan (picture by Bullit Marquez)

epa photographer Dennis M. Sabangan (picture by Bullit Marquez)

27. November 2013 by elio
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Nic Bothma – Our Stories: Super Typhoon Haiyan

Nic Bothma, regional chief photographer at epa european pressphoto agency, reports from his assignment on the eastern Philippines devastated by super typhoon Haiyan.

Landing in Tacloban airport at night to join the formidable Philippines crew of Dennis, Francis, Mast, and Ritchy* was like something out of a Steven Spielberg movie. I was the only one on a late night US C-130 flight. After the cargo was unloaded I jumped out the back of the plane carrying 4 backpacks of gear and supplies to find crowds around the aircraft trying to board being pushed back by soldiers. The propellers of the plane were still going and it was dark, people were everywhere and I picked my way around the plane making sure I was not to become chop suey by the props. I was sure someone was about to be. There did not seem to be anyone in control except a few soldiers running around.

Nic Bothma interviewing children for the portrait series Children of Haiyan Photo: Bagus Indahono

Nic Bothma interviewing children for the portrait series Children of Haiyan Photo: Bagus Indahono

Nic Bothma photographing children for the portrait series Children of Haiyan Photo: Bagus Indahono

Nic Bothma photographing children for the portrait series Children of Haiyan Photo: Bagus Indahono

About 35 meters from the tarmac was the epa office/accommodation of the crew who had been living amongst the rubble of the airport control tower for five days with very little water or food. Ritchy spotted me in the crowd and we made our way through throngs of refugees. Stepping over families trying to sleep and people standing almost everywhere amongst rubble and debris. I was sweating like a pig in the hot and humid tropical air, the mosquitos behaved like kamikaze pilots, the smell unforgettable.

Meeting the crew was awesome and we began joking and laughing and have not stopped. It’s a great way to get perspective rather than getting sucked in and too serious.

The first few days of this story were covered by Dennis and Francis who are my heros. They did unbelievable work in some of the worst conditions imaginable. When I arrived there was a shortage of food and water. We had brought some in so were ok for a bit till more could arrive. The coverage started turning and broadening from its original focus of corpses, rescue, evacuations to starting to tell more of the human stories.

I seem to gravitate towards children when I am in a country covering something. After a few days it dawned on me that the portraits would be a great way to simplify the story telling and try make something unique. There are a plethora of images surging through the wire each day between the five big agencies all very well represented here.

Ten year old Filipino boy Christian Rosanto poses for a portrait in the village of Santa Rita on the super typhoon devastated Samar Island, Philippines 20 November 2013. epa / Nic Bothma

Ten year old Filipino boy Christian Rosanto poses for a portrait in the village of Santa Rita on the super typhoon Haiyan devastated Samar Island, Philippines 20 November 2013. epa / Nic Bothma

Photographing the Children of Haiyan portrait series these last few days during coverage of the aftermath of the Typhoon was extremely rewarding for me. I find children are pure, honest and unencumbered with ego and baggage that adults carry. They bring hope and reflect light in dark places. None more so than in the eastern Philippines where these kids survived the world’s biggest storm with most losing everything including relatives but continue to smile in a lot of cases.

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*epa photographers covering the typhoon aftermath on the Philippiness: Dennis Sabangan, Francis Malasig, Mast Irham, Nic Bothma, Ritchie B. Tongo, Bagus Indahono, Jay Rommel Labra and Rolex Dela Pena

21. November 2013 by elio
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Matt Campbell – Our Stories: epa’s first steps in the US

Matt Campbell, Director and Chief Photographer – North America at epa, is sharing the story of how he got into the european pressphoto agency and what it was like to open up epa’s editorial operation in the US. Thank you, Matt Campbell, for sharing this story with us!

When the european pressphoto agency approached me, Matt Campbell, in early 2003 about coming on board to launch the epa office in New York City prior to the company’s May 1 global launch, I could not have been happier! The timing was perfect and the job description sounded almost too good to be true.

I gladly applied for the job and was shortly thereafter hired on March 1, 2003. It is almost impossible for me to fathom that a decade has passed since then! Those first few months were a frenetic challenge of trying to quickly establish a theretofore almost unknown company name in the US (epa content was previously distributed in the US via another agency so an epa byline was a rarity in the States). Being in NYC, I was in a place to sit down with many representatives from organizations ranging from the NBA to the United Nations to explain who the european pressphoto agency was and obtain credentialing recognition.

Matt Campbell about the european pressphoto agency in the US

In mid-2003 we were five full timers in the entire US and Canada. A staff photographer in NYC, LA, Washington, DC and Miami plus a Director in Washington, DC. Many of the freelancers who began working with epa at that time still work closely with us today and more importantly many of those original stringers are now employed as full-time staff photographers.

epa now has full time staff in Boston, NYC, DC, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco and LA with multiple full timers in three of those cities. Our office in Washington went from a literal closet in a partner agency’s office in 2003 to an office which we recently doubled in size from the one which we had moved to in 2007 from that previous closet! epa’s global picturedesk operation which had run only in Frankfurt for many years, now expanded to Washington, Cairo and Bangkok and a full-time desk editor now works in DC as part of the US operation. Indeed sixteen full time employees from that original five is amazing growth for a media company, especially considering the turbulent economy of the US in the past six years and even more turbulence within the media industry!

In ten years, the european pressphoto agency has lived up to my original image of a flexible and creative company looking to approach photojournalism from a different view. I have often said I would rather a photographer miss the ‘standard’ photo because he or she was trying to make something different and better than to just line up with the pack and make a copy. The approach of tight, talented groups tackling event coverage rather than big teams of blanket coverage has been a successful and rewarding approach to so many things we have done.

european pressphoto agency photographer Matt Campbell by epa / Rhona Wise

european pressphoto agency photographer Matt Campbell by epa / Rhona Wise

It has been said that the person who wakes up every day excited about what they do at work is ahead of most people. The past ten years has been actual proof for me that this adage is true. I have worked alongside some of the most talented people in the business at epa since 2003 and like waking up on a new day, I’m looking eagerly ahead to another decade of enthralling images and friendship from my colleagues at the european pressphoto agency. – Matt Campbell

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04. November 2013 by elio
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Visa pour l’Image Exhibition of epa photographer Abir Abdullah

For his first ‘Visa pour l’Image’ exhibition epa photographer Abir Abdullah returns to the photojournalism festival after twelve years. Abir shares his impressions now and then.

Portrait of epa photographer Abir Abdullah whose images were exhibited at  Visa pour l'Image 2013

Visa pour l’Image exhibited epa photographer Abir Abdullah’s images in 2013

It was 12 years ago when I visited for the first time the photojournalism festival Visa pour l’Image in Perpignan, France. I just completed my diploma course in photojournalism at Pathshala South Asian Media Academy and scored first. So our principal and mentor Shahidul Alam arranged my visit to the festival. The French embassy in Dhaka sponsored the trip.

I was excited yet nervous because I didn’t know French and heard that French people don’t like to speak English. And of course the food was unfamiliar. So I was counting the days of my trip with a little bit of anxiety but couldn’t share it with anybody! My family was excited about it and my wife and me were expecting our first son in October. My elder sister gave me some money to buy perfumes for the family. I arrived in Paris on 06 September and a French gentleman received me at the airport and we changed airports for the flight to Perpignan. This official gave me money for the hotel bill, foods and managed my accreditation card.

I didn’t know anyone from the festival authority. I didn’t know any venue of the exhibitions so I was kind of lost. And of course there was this language problem! Anyway, I was getting to know the city slowly, found the exhibition venues and attended the evening presentations with the huge screens. But I was very isolated from the festive people and was thinking when would I do my show here? Could I ever do it in my life?

After spending seven days I went back home via Paris and Robert Pledge, president of Contact Press Images, invited me and Shahidul Alam for lunch and showed me the office. I was very impressed to see the Contact Press office in Paris! I went back home safely and after three weeks our first son was born.

Abir returns for his own ‘Visa pour l’Image’ exhibition

My son is now 12 years old and I was selected for the show in Perpignan. So it happened after 12 long years. I grew older, experienced and know lots of friends. I was told that the european pressphoto agency will have a stand at the venue. When I got the news from Visa pour l’Image festival director Jean-François Leroy, I was almost crying in joy. Later, Maria Mann, my colleague and mentor who gave me great inspirations, phoned me and congratulated me saying everyone at the agency is happy about the exhibition. Joerg Schierenbeck, epa’s President & CEO, wanted me to visit our head office in Frankfurt before I go to Perpignan. I went to meet other officials including our Editor in Chief Hannah Hess and other editors in Frankfurt. I spent three days there – learning more about the strategy and future coverage plans from the editors.

I arrived in Perpignan with the start of the professional week on September 2. The following night I joined a fantastic dinner with colleagues at the seaside in Collioure. What a wonderful location and evening! The next day, I had my presentations in the Palais des Congrès and delivered a very emotional speech about my work which is featured in the ‘Visa pour l’Image’ exhibition on Death Traps.

I had a fantastic week this year meeting such legendary photographers as David Douglas Duncan, Jon G. Morris, and Don McCullin. I was no more isolated this time, especially my epa colleagues invited me to dinner and lunch and were good company. So today was the last day of my stay in Perpignan, I went to my exhibition and very happy to talk about the photos. They showed their reactions for the safety of the garment workers and I think I am successful in a way that I could create some sort of emotion with my photographs.

Photo from the exhibition 'Death Traps' by Abir Abdullah - Firefighters and Bangladeshi civilians try to extinguish a fire in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Photo from the Visa pour l’Image exhibition ‘Death Traps’ by Abir Abdullah – Firefighters and Bangladeshi civilians try to extinguish a fire in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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02. October 2013 by roberto
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